I Made This!

Too much time on my hands? Maybe! Got inspiration for this piece from Pinterest:

Sea Shells, Vintage Carnival Glass Vase, Vintage Bead Necklace.

Sea Shells, Vintage Carnival Glass Vase, Vintage Bead Necklace.

 

I started with a vintage carnival glass vase that belonged to my grandfather. I found a tag on the bottom that looks like it was purchased at a garage sale. I have no idea of its age or value –just that it is covered with a relief of mermaids. I’ve been collecting sea shells (mostly bought) for many years. The beaded necklace came from a thrift store and was probably from the ’50’s or earlier. (I liked the way it blended with the colors of the vase.) The base underneath the vase that is covered with shells was an old ceramic pillar candle holder. The shells and coral on top are affixed to yet another taller candle holder. The base pieces —candle holders, larger shells, coral piece and vase— are glued in place with liquid nails and the rest of the shells were affixed with hot glue. The beaded necklace is not glued on –I could still wear it someday! This is a very heavy piece.

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Family Heirloom Transformed

My husband and I just completed this conversion of my grandparent’s bed. They slept in it for over 60 years –then my husband and I for the last 10 or so. We made it into a bench. My husband did the carpentry and I painted it. The seat cushion is wrapped in a quilt my mom made. I hope this will become an heirloom one of my children will appreciate someday as much as I do.

Used to be a queen size bed.

Used to be a queen size bed.

Kitchen is DONE!

Finally, we are finished –mostly. Have some touching up to do, but these will likely not be apparent in the photos. We will probably change out the light fixture over the eating peninsula (that is a bit too large) for a smaller single light pendant.  The cabinets are cherry with a ‘frost’ finish that is not quite a white wash. I’m told they will darken a bit with age.

Before and After

Before and After

Before and After

Before and After

Plate display cabinet covers the vent above the microhood.

Plate display cabinet covers the vent above the microhood.

Decorative plate rack cabinet covers the hood vent.

Decorative plate rack cabinet covers the hood vent.

Spindle and spoke shelf over the window to display my collection of tea pots.

Spindle and spoke shelf over the window to display my collection of tea pots. The style came from the barn red plate rack that is on the wall next to the pantry door that has a spindle rail on it. The pantry door is also painted the same barn red. Are you sensing a theme here? LOL

Close up of back splash.

Close up of back splash.

Plate rack and spice cubbies. A direct copy from the last kitchen --I liked it so much I did it again.

Plate rack and spice cubbies. A direct copy from the last kitchen –I liked it so much I did it again.

This is clearly a galley kitchen. This is the sink side. There's just the two of us most of the time and we enjoy intimate meals at the peninsula.

This is clearly a galley kitchen. This is the sink side. There’s just the two of us most of the time and we enjoy intimate meals at the peninsula. The dishwasher is a Bosch. It is so quiet you have to try to hear it when it’s running! It has a red light that shows on the floor to let you know. There is a third rack on top for silverware that allows for removal of the silverware rack on the bottom to gain extra space. The sink is Vigo. Just purchased a rack (you can’t see here) for the bottom to drain stuff and keep the bottom from getting scratched so easily. The faucet is Delta Touch 2 O. I’m spoiled now –wouldn’t have any other kind.  The cabinets are cherry with a beadboard door style made by DeWils.

The range side of the galley. Loving the LG gas double oven range. There's nothing I can't cook on this thing. It contains the double ovens and all of the multiple BTU high-powered burners I had in my last kitchen that were in separate appliances and much more costly. This is a real space and money saver. Plus it's easier to clean! The microhood is also wonderful. It has a vent that extends in the bottom to gain more coverage over the burners.

The range side of the galley. Loving the LG gas double oven range. There’s nothing I can’t cook on this thing. It contains the double ovens and all of the multiple BTU high-powered burners I had in my last kitchen that were in separate appliances and much more costly. This is a real space and money saver. Plus it’s easier to clean! The microhood is also wonderful. It has a vent that extends in the bottom to gain more coverage over the burners.

Renderings ~ Manufactured Home Reno

We’ve been toying with the idea of selling off my dream home. (You know the one that I said they’d have to drag me out feet first ’cause I proclaimed I would never leave.) Well, as the kids are leaving -we have one left and it’s time for him to leave the nest too. So, we’ve got a big house on a largish lot that is a bit larger than we want to contend with into our twilight years. Not to mention the cost… So we’ve been looking into ‘age restricted communities’ locally… That’s right -for the “55 and over set”.  I have to admit the ‘community’ aspect of a park with like minded and similar aged people is appealing. (Oh for heaven’s sake! I know I don’t look a day over 40! LOL!).

Age restricted communities here means manufactured home parks where the homes are set on concrete foundations and can come with garages and small yards. There are even options to own the land.  Even though the parks are tidy with lots of amenities like swimming pools and club houses, it is obvious that the homes have become dated.  Clearly they are dated to the time frame when the parks were started which is in the early 80’s here, so they are mostly in need of renovating.

I’ve been collecting some ideas on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/pamdesigns/mobile-renovation/   Based on a local real estate listing with lots of interior pictures, I have come up with a few  renovation ideas of my own:

Painted, gable shakes added, pergola over wrap-around porch and arbor over garage; stonework added; windows replaced and shutters added.

Painted, gable shakes added, pergola over wrap-around porch and arbor over garage; stonework added; windows replaced and shutters added.

Replaced windows; tongue and groove ceiling, laminate floors, painted over paneling. Structure to enclose dining room adjacent to living room.

Replaced windows; tongue and groove ceiling, laminate floors, painted over paneling. Structure to enclose dining room adjacent to living room.

Living View 2

This dining room is in the center of the house and has no outside windows. It's the transitional space that has doorways to all of the other major parts of the home.

This dining room is in the center of the house and has no outside windows. It’s the transitional space that has doorways to all of the other major parts of the home.

Dining Room ~ Walls were added to define and enlarge the dining room space. Ceiling was dropped and a tray detail created that includes a tin ceiling in an antiqued painted finish. Rendering by Pamela Rodriguez

Dining Room ~ Walls were added to define and enlarge the dining room space. Ceiling was dropped and a tray detail created that includes a tin ceiling in an antiqued painted finish.

Dining View 3 Dining View 1

New finishes, appliances, cabinets & sink. Plan not changed.

Kitchen ~ New finishes, appliances, cabinets & sink. Plan not changed.

New Renderings

Wow –it’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything to this blog.  Sorry for being ‘off the radar’ for a bit. I’ve been ill for a few weeks and my ‘social media presence’ has suffered while I’ve been off feeling sorry for myself.  Well –f*** that! Time to get back in the game! While I’ve been away, I’ve actually been diligently working on some renderings. These are part of a project called Spanish Colonial ~ Dreaming of Todos Santos.

Dining Room ViewFoyer ViewKitchen View 1Kitchen View 2Livingroom View 1Livingroom View 2

….And an homage to the arrival of spring.Alternate ColorFront View

Seaside Ensuit ~ A Collection of Renderings.

This past week I have been creating a set of renderings inspired by a single photo of a design by Gary Riggs Designs.

Gary Riggs Design

Gary Riggs Design

The imaginary scene I created included an ensuit bath overlooking “somewhere” on the California Central Coast in the late afternoon in June.  The background scene is typical of sea views at the time and season of the year in that it looks a little misty.  Like the fog is going to roll in as it usually does at night along with some wind sometimes.

Seaside Bathroom

Seaside Bathroom

Wouldn’t it be nice to sit in this foamy warm bath with scented candles watching the sun set into the fog rolling in just beyond the horizon?  You can almost hear the waves lapping at the shore on the beach below.

Seaside Bedroom

Seaside Bedroom

This is the view I created inspired by Mr. Rigg’s design.  I just love that bed!  I wanted to give it more of a “Pacific” flair with a nod to the Far East and added more seagrass and wicker items.  The colors are a bit more subdued with the colors of sand and sea.  I enjoyed the opportunity to use blue and white accent pottery.

Seaside Bedroom

Seaside Bedroom

We’ll be closing the doors soon because it tends to get a bit nippy when the wind kicks up and the fog rolls in.

I’ve added some views!  You will likely never see a space from this perspective, but 3D plan views are much more interesting to look at than line drawings.  Bird’s eye views show you the floor plan in 3D of a room.  3D axon views of floor plans show you how an ensemble of rooms are adjoined and relate to one another in scale and material textures and color:

A bird's eye view (orthographic plan view) of the bathroom.

A bird’s eye view (orthographic plan view) of the bathroom.

A 3D plan view (Axon) of the total ensemble of related rooms and spaces.

A 3D plan view (Axon) of the total ensemble of related rooms and spaces.

“Painting” With Chief Architect

Lately I’ve been working on a landscape design which has lead me to create some renderings.  Along the way I have been investigating some artistic techniques that are available within my drafting software of choice (Chief Architect) and also manipulating the finished renders with my photo editing program Photoshop Elements.  I have often thought about getting back into painting but I am really excited about some of the results I’ve been able to achieve with the computer.  An example of one of my “paintings” is the background image of this blog.  I will post others as the are completed.

Image using Chief’s “painting” technique.

The same image with “watercolor” technique applied

This one was crated in Chief Architect but was given a dappled painting effect with Photoshop Elements.

Painted effect with PE

The same image with the painted effect and a line overlay with PE.

This image was also created in CA and amended with PE.

This is an older rendering that I applied a painting effect with PE.

An older render

The same render with a pallet knife painting effect applied and “texturized” with a canvas texture.

Older rendering

The same rendering with a dry pastel effect applied.

This view has had a “poster print” effect applied to it with PE.

This is the same view with a “graphic pen” technique applied to it. If I were to try to attempt something like this by hand I’m sure it would take days to do rather than the minute and a half it took to do this with Photoshop Elements.

Ray Trace rendering without “outdoor lighting” turned off to show shadows.

Same rendering with painting effect applied.

PE is the baby brother program of Photoshop and is very inexpensive.  There are a lot of photo editing programs out there.  This one came with my computer.  I’ve used it for years and I’m just learning some of the many wonderful things I can do with it.  One of the things I’ve done in the past is create iron on transfers with images onto fabric.  You can purchase the transfer paper from a craft store and run it through your printer.  It’s amazing the things you can do with a little imagination and creativity.