Master Bath Remodel

I’ve finally settled on a design for our master bathroom that eliminates the tub completely. We’ve been living without one for six months and have decided we’d rather have the space and a larger shower that will be more accessible as we get older. In fact, was inspired by some recent health issues to make this adjustment. As we are living in a 55+ community, this is not a bad idea for resale purposes. We will continue to use the existing cabinetry to be painted white with new doors, drawer fronts and hardware added. The current counter is a bit low at 30″ (even for my husband and I who aren’t very tall). So we’ll be installing pedestal sinks without the pedestal set into the counter as semi-vessel sinks that will add about 4″ height.  I chose the pebble accent tile not just because I like the look of it, but because I love the way it will feel under foot as a finish for the shower pan. The rest of the tile is just a simple white, inexpensive subway tile that will make the space feel bright and spacious. The flooring is actually a strip vinyl product that looks like wood, that is easy to install, and is water resistant. The fabric for the window valance and the vanity skirt I actually purchased and never used for the same set up (only for the kitchen) in our last house. It actually coordinates very well with the bedding we have in the adjoining master bedroom. The plumbing fixtures and cabinet hardware look like brass but are actually going to be polished nickel.

View 1

View 1

View 2

View 2

View 3

View 3

Before and After Floor Plan

Before and After Floor Plan

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Kitchen is DONE!

Finally, we are finished –mostly. Have some touching up to do, but these will likely not be apparent in the photos. We will probably change out the light fixture over the eating peninsula (that is a bit too large) for a smaller single light pendant.  The cabinets are cherry with a ‘frost’ finish that is not quite a white wash. I’m told they will darken a bit with age.

Before and After

Before and After

Before and After

Before and After

Plate display cabinet covers the vent above the microhood.

Plate display cabinet covers the vent above the microhood.

Decorative plate rack cabinet covers the hood vent.

Decorative plate rack cabinet covers the hood vent.

Spindle and spoke shelf over the window to display my collection of tea pots.

Spindle and spoke shelf over the window to display my collection of tea pots. The style came from the barn red plate rack that is on the wall next to the pantry door that has a spindle rail on it. The pantry door is also painted the same barn red. Are you sensing a theme here? LOL

Close up of back splash.

Close up of back splash.

Plate rack and spice cubbies. A direct copy from the last kitchen --I liked it so much I did it again.

Plate rack and spice cubbies. A direct copy from the last kitchen –I liked it so much I did it again.

This is clearly a galley kitchen. This is the sink side. There's just the two of us most of the time and we enjoy intimate meals at the peninsula.

This is clearly a galley kitchen. This is the sink side. There’s just the two of us most of the time and we enjoy intimate meals at the peninsula. The dishwasher is a Bosch. It is so quiet you have to try to hear it when it’s running! It has a red light that shows on the floor to let you know. There is a third rack on top for silverware that allows for removal of the silverware rack on the bottom to gain extra space. The sink is Vigo. Just purchased a rack (you can’t see here) for the bottom to drain stuff and keep the bottom from getting scratched so easily. The faucet is Delta Touch 2 O. I’m spoiled now –wouldn’t have any other kind.  The cabinets are cherry with a beadboard door style made by DeWils.

The range side of the galley. Loving the LG gas double oven range. There's nothing I can't cook on this thing. It contains the double ovens and all of the multiple BTU high-powered burners I had in my last kitchen that were in separate appliances and much more costly. This is a real space and money saver. Plus it's easier to clean! The microhood is also wonderful. It has a vent that extends in the bottom to gain more coverage over the burners.

The range side of the galley. Loving the LG gas double oven range. There’s nothing I can’t cook on this thing. It contains the double ovens and all of the multiple BTU high-powered burners I had in my last kitchen that were in separate appliances and much more costly. This is a real space and money saver. Plus it’s easier to clean! The microhood is also wonderful. It has a vent that extends in the bottom to gain more coverage over the burners.

Remodelling the Mobile Money Pit ~ Renderings

We’ve lived with construction and most of our stuff still in boxes now for a couple of months since moving to Sunny Hills, a 55+ manufactured home community in Santa Maria, California after moving from our somewhat larger stick built home in the same town. It’s a triple-wide manufactured home that’s a little over 1700 square feet with two bedrooms, two baths a large living & dining space, a separate family room and has an attached two-car garage. The lot is small but backs up to a green belt area with many beautiful birch, maple and cypress trees. The ‘coach’ was built in 1987 so is ripe for updating and came with a lot of deferred maintenance from the former owner.  We had the cottage cheese ceiling scraped, retextured and painted throughout. We also removed all of the carpeting and replaced most of it with laminate floating flooring that looks like hand-scraped maple hardwood in a darker finish.  The kitchen and laundry/pantry will have a floating vinyl floor that looks like tile, is resilient and easy to clean. The only room to have carpet will be the master bedroom. We’ve also repainted most of the place and installed new window coverings. (I’m proud to say I installed the blinds myself in the sitting room and family room myself and was surprised at how easy it was!) Most of the house will be rewired during the kitchen remodel and we are still debating replacing the plumbing. (Much will be determined when we get into the kitchen remodel.) We were fortunate that a new roof was added only a year ago and there is a new furnace.

Since we moved in, we also moved and reconfigured a non-load baring wall which entailed expanding the ceiling, adding a light fixture and retexturing and painting the walls. It seemed like an awful lot just to move the wall a foot or so and make it longer, but the result was spectacular! You can no longer see into the guest bath now when entering the front door or sitting in the dining room! We also had to completely rebuild the front stoop outside the front door and the wall and floor inside the front door entry that had dry rot and mold from an old roof leak. The leak was repaired when the roof was replaced, but the damage caused by it was not. So that was our first undertaking when we moved in.

So, I’m biding my time waiting for our new kitchen remodel to begin. I’ve created a few renderings that I think will reflect the after photos pretty closely.  I’ll do a post of the ‘before and after’ photos when the construction is completed. The kitchen should be completed around the end of December. The other spaces in the house might take a bit longer. The exterior might be years from now. We won’t even start with the landscaping until springtime.

Kitchen:

triple-wide kitchen 3

triple-wide kitchen 2

triple-wide kitchen 1

Adjoining laundry room is also the pantry. Comes from Home Depot. Mine is primed for painting and the frame will be painted barn red as shown in the  rendering.

Adjoining laundry room is also the pantry. Comes from Home Depot. Mine is primed for painting and the frame will be painted barn red as shown in the rendering.

Dewils Cherry Cabinets in Frost stain. The door style is Oneida in the Designer Series. The countertop material is LG Himacs -Galaxy pattern in Cosmos colorway.

Dewils Cherry Cabinets in Frost stain. The door style is Oneida in the Designer Series. The countertop material is LG Himacs -Galaxy pattern in Cosmos colorway.

This is the backsplash material. I've not decided whether it will be installed vertically as shown in the renderings or this way. What do you think?

This is the backsplash material. I’ve not decided whether it will be installed vertically as shown in the renderings or this way. What do you think?

Master Bedroom & Bath:

Master Bath View 1

Master Bath View 1

Master Bath View 2

Master Bath View 2

Master Bedroom

Master Bedroom

Sitting Room/Den:

This is the "formal" end of the house. (See front door on left.) It's adjacent to the dining space. Notice the truss work on the ceiling that is the same as that in the dining room rendering.

This is the “formal” end of the house. (See front door on left.) It’s adjacent to the dining space. Notice the truss work on the ceiling that is the same as that in the dining room rendering.

Den, Dining Room and Entry Area:

Entry (Next to fireplace)

Entry (Next to fireplace)

View from Entry & Den into Dining Space

View from Entry & Den into Dining Space

View through Dining Space toward Entry.

View through Dining Space toward Entry.

Exterior/Landscaping:

Entry

Entry

Front View- we won't be watering grass anymore. We're planning to replace the landscaping with mostly succulents with some day lilies and canna . lilies. The rest is river rock and some large boulders and driftwood features.

Front View- we won’t be watering grass anymore. We’re planning to replace the landscaping with mostly succulents with some day lilies and canna . lilies. The rest is river rock and some large boulders and driftwood features.

I’ll add new spaces as I produce the renderings to this post.

Alameda Project

I’ve currently posted some views to my Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/pages/pamdesigns-3D/129609572712?ref=hl of some renderings that I created using Chief Architect software that will ultimately be added to my website portfolio. These were from a plan that I designed using Chief specifically for a portfolio piece.  All of the rendering (ray tracing) was done with Chief as well. Some minor touch ups were done with Photoshop Elements. For my fellow Chief users:  each ray trace took about 10 to 15 hours to run using the ‘high quality’ setting with variations of photon mapping and final gathering settings depending on the surfaces. I’ve learned that shiny metals can create all kinds of havoc and getting stainless steel to ‘represent’ is probably the hardest thing to render. Each view has a corresponding file where I deleted everything that wasn’t in the view to shorten the rendering time as much as possible.  All in all, I started this design about three weeks ago and the rendering process for about two of those weeks.

The current seven renderings are of the “public” indoor spaces that includes the kitchen, dining and livingroom spaces with views to the entry foyer and the outdoor deck that overlooks the hills in a rural setting that you would typically find in the area known as Alameda just outside of Oakland in the Bay Area of Northern California.. The views take place in the winter (date/time set for current) and vary from afternoon to night lighting.

My style choice for this design was decidedly modern. Primarily because my portfolio to date has represented traditional styling. I wanted to show that I am equally adept at modern and contemporary design. I also pointedly chose cool colors, sleek linear lines, hard edges and lots of stainless steel to show that these materials and shapes can exist in a space without making it seem too cold and uncomfortable. The success of this space has much to do with lighting and complementary textured pieces as well as lots of greenery and organic elements that soften the space. The effect I think is very livable.

Next, I will be working on the master suite. And in the future, designing the outdoor spaces and landscaping. There is a media room I may throw in eventually.Dining Room 1 Dining Room 2 Kitchen 1 Kitchen 2 Living Room 1 Living Room 2 Living Room 3

Laundry Day

Everyday is laundry day at my house.  There are four adults (me, my husband, my son and his significant other).  We process at least two loads a day in my large capacity HE laundry set.  The laundry room at left is not mine.  (Though I wouldn’t mind it if it were.) My laundry room doubles as my home office and sewing room.  It’s never quite as tidy.  It was one of the rooms that was part of our recent remodel that included turning an extra bedroom into a hobby/laundry room.

“For those of us who like to roll out pastry while watching the spin cycle…hehe..” rosesandrustblogger.blogspot.com

Someday when my son and his girlfriend move out, the home office will move into their old room.

My laundry room isn’t this big… but if it was! (bobvila.com)

Until then, the laundry room is our multi-purpose room.

Laundry is not one of my favorite chores.  I don’t ‘enjoy’ ironing  or folding as some people claim to.  Though I’m grateful that I live in an age where technology really does most of the work.  I’m lucky to have a Whirlpool Duet Steam washer and dryer set that I purchased when we moved into our house.  The steam really does make a difference in the washer for making the clothes cleaner and getting out stains.  Even my daughter noticed when she was down visiting this summer.  HE as they may be (highly efficient), they are not cheap to run -especially if you use the steam functions.  What used to be a load that ran for 45 minutes to an hour now runs for an hour and a half to two hours.  While the machine gauges how much water to save, it still uses electricity that whole time.  That with the unbelievably high cost of sundries such as laundry soap, softener and the like, laundry has become expensive! 

I have recently been making my own laundry detergent http://whynotsew.blogspot.com/2010/08/how-to-make-homemade-laundry-detergent.html .  It’s incredibly inexpensive and easy to make.  You get 576 loads (at 1/2 cup of the stuff per load) out of one batch that costs less than the price of a 50 ounce good quality HE liquid detergent bottle (that claims to do 32 loads).  I like that I know what chemicals I’m using and can make it as allergen free as the bar soap I use.   My first batch came out the consistency of jello, so I’ve had to cut back the bar soap to about a quarter of a bar.  (Actually thinking of switching to a liquid hand soap to avoid the jelling problem.)

If I had a laundry tub in my laundry room, it would look like this one.

I’ve also discovered a recipe for homemade fabric softener that uses inexpensive hair conditioner as the softening agent.       http://www.food.com/recipe/homemade-fabric-softener-355877  So far so good ~ clothes are getting just as soft and clean as they did with the expensive storebought stuff.  Though I think the steam feature of the washing machine has a lot to do with it.

My grandmother and my mom both had outdoor clotheslines.  Just think of the money and electricity we’d save if we dried our laundry that way.

My friend Glenna had her husband put up a line in the backyard.  She likes the fresh smell of the sun-dried, wind-blown linens.  She’s a collector of vintage glassware and tends to like  stuff from the Depression Era.  Her degree in sociology has not gone to waste since her retirement as a family counselor.  She now studies the culture of women and their crafts of the last century.  She’s enjoying her retirement as she quilts, sews and crochets beautiful pieces.  (Some of which I’m lucky to have.)  We’ve been friends for almost 30 years and have shared many trials and tribulations.  I think she’d appreciate this use of her clothesline (if need be… lol)

Design on a Dime

Well maybe not a dime ~ Actually free because I did my own design work.  Maybe I should call it “Design for My Time”.   All of the photos I’m showing you are a culmination of decor efforts and wheeling and dealing I’ve done over the past 20 months since we (my husband Niceforo and I) purchased our home.  It’s hard to believe we’ve been here for almost two years already!

Powder Room

This is the new powder room (part of our recent remodel). It’s really hard to take pictures of a tiny space like this without getting myself in the mirror’s reflection. I love the waterfall faucet that looks something like an old hand pump that I got on ebay. The towel rack was from Ross. It was wrought iron that I painted white. The flower vase was from thrift store.

Attic Access Cover

This is the attic access cover that is now directly over the sink in the powder room. (It used to be in the laundry room in the same spot before we remodeled). I covered it with a piece of leftover backsplash material from the kitchen that had the fleur de lis pattern and had my husband trim out the edges with leftover baseboard trim to make a frame. Then painted the whole thing with chrome spray paint. When it was dry, I painted it with some leftover flat white latex paint then wiped it before it completely dried creating the antiqued look you see.

I like to think of myself as a savvy shopper.  Everything you see I’ve purchased from bargain sources both online and locally at thrift stores and discount stores.  I like shopping at Ross and TJ Max.  Usually I know what I’m looking for before I go into these stores, but often come out with unexpected treasures.  I regularly peruse ebay, Amazon and craigslist.  A few items are family heirlooms like much of the glassware in the china cabinet and the quilts displayed that my mom and BFF Glenna made..

I found this shelf on Craigslist and spray painted it barn red. It’s showcasing a lovely platter that was a gift from my friends at the GE Monogram Experience Center. It’s not only a beautiful addition to my new pantry wall but it’s very handy for hanging my aprons and cloth shopping bags (so I don’t forget them on the way to the grocery store). San Luis Obispo (town near us) now charges you for using plastic bags instead of your own cloth bags. I’m guessing our town is not far behind.

The living-dining room is long, narrow and has vaulted ceilings.  The curtains were chosen solely to enhance the drama of the tall space and to finish off the windows.  My son Mico and I had quite an adventure hanging those 120″ curtains!  I don’t do ladders and am terrified of heights.  So I am so grateful to have had his help hanging them.

Clearly, my taste is ‘unique’  by many standards.  I’m drawn to French Country and Shabby Chic… though I also like Victorian details.  So I tend to blend them preferring to use bright colors and rich woods. I love living with items that have a story behind them, especially family heirlooms that tell the story of my family or recall memories of the people they represent or places where they came from. I spend a lot of time in my home (since I live and work there) and believe firmly that the only person I really need to impress with my design aesthetic is me.  Fortunately, my husband likes my style and I take his taste into consideration too… otherwise I think it would look way more ‘girly’ than it does.  The point is, when you decorate your space ~ do what makes you happy (and try not to piss off the other people who live there ;-).  Keep in mind there are basic principles of design (like balance and symmetry) that can be applied to any style aesthetic to make a space ‘work’.

Entry Table Detail

The top two old books on the table are tattered and torn from the 1920’s. I doubt they have any value to anybody but me because they belonged to my dad.

Living Room

These wing chairs were Craigslist finds and the stained glass table lamp and firescreen came from ebay. The floor lamp is also stained glass which my mom gave to me many years ago.

Living Room

The table in the foreground used to be a large end table my parents had in the 70’s that had dark wood. I painted and distressed it for a shabby look. I purchased a used glass covered painting -ditched the painting and used the glass and frame to cover a quilted piece my mom made. I painted the frame to match the table. The Chippendale settee was a great find that I got while working for an office furniture company in Texas for the price of having it delivered to my house. It had been a return from a customer and I got it at their warehouse sale. I had it reupholstered in the blue buffalo checks when I moved back to California about 10 years ago.

Mirror

Just this past weekend my husband and I were checking out the local thrift stores and found this mirror. It’s a Chinese reproduction that was a steal for $40. It’s in excellent condition and has some lovely painted detail. I thought it coordinated perfectly with my dining chairs and china cabinet.

Dining Area

The chairs were the biggest expenditure for this space. They were purchased on ebay. Details on the wall include the scrolling metal planter boxes (from Ross) that coordinated with the existing chandelier. They are filled with thrift store silver trays. Some of them I made into chalkboards with chalkboard paint. The table was a Craigslist find. I’m thinking of painting it a pale yellow to match some of the other painted furniture in the living room. You’ll recognize the vintage tole trays on the wall from a former post. I purchased some of them while visiting Eugene, Oregon, at some antique stores. A couple came from ebay.

China Cabinet

You might recognize my china cabinet from another former post where I relayed our ‘adventure’ in collecting it from an ebay seller in Simi Valley. I’ve paired down the contents (considerably REALLY!). Many of the items were family heirlooms. My great grandmother collected cranberry glass and I’ve added to it.